2nd Sunday of Epiphany – Sunday 17 January 2016 – John 2:1-11

2nd Sunday of Epiphany – Sunday 17 January 2016 – John 2:1-11

I’ve had a break as I’d got a bit stale but this new way of looking at Scripture I’m enjoying – I hope you do it.

I got the inspiration from this article I read over Christmas:

http://www.abc.net.au/religion/articles/2015/12/29/4379689.htm

In this Prof. Sarah Coakley considers left side of the brain and the right side to produce different thinking states. The left ‘side of the brain (with) that neurological states associated with cool analysis and executive decisions’. 

Whereas ‘In contrast, the right brain’s capacity to replenish, enrich and re-invigorate our cultural imagination by means of meditation, dream, myth, ritual, music and poetry’. 

So My three questions will be:

  1. What left hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  2. What right hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  3. What might I preach on – living in suburban Kidderminster.
  1. What left hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  1. The chain of ‘command’ worked efficiently – mother to Jesus to mother to servants to Jesus to servants to steward to disciples to us.
  2. Wine is offered to guests as a wedding. Hospitality is crucial. There’s either been a lack of planning about the amount of wine needed or there’s been only the amount the family could afford bought.
  3. The Steward is ‘bothered’ by Jesus overturning the usual way wine is served. A social norm has been broken.
  1. What right hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  1. That Mary knows Jesus better than he knows himself. He thinks his time hasn’t come but Mary knows actually it has.
  2. The jars for the Jewish rites of purification are empty. This ritual has been abandoned. Jesus refills it but something extra is then done. It’s not used for washing but drinking.
  3. His glory is revealed. ‘Poverty was turned to riches, sorrow into joy.’ (Preface for Epiphany – Common Worship) His glory is seen. It is tasted.
  1. What might I preach on – living in suburban Kidderminster.
  1. We are living in a visual age where we need to see to believe. We need to see to understand. Faith in the abstract can’t be seen but it can be tasted.
  2. We in the west who are rich in material items can be poor in others eg loneliness, fear, shame. How does our faith turn these into ‘riches’.
  3. How might the outcome (as yet unknown) of the Primates 2016 fill/encourage our faith.
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