2nd Sunday of Easter – Sunday 3rd April 2016 – John 20:19-end

2nd Sunday of Easter – Sunday 3rd April 2016 – John 20:19-end

Had a break as I’d got a bit stale but this new way of looking at Scripture I’m enjoying – I hope you do it.

(I gather the link I’ve been giving isn’t working) – The article is ‘Angels and Dreams: Second Naivete and the Christian Imagination’ and is on http://www.abc.net.au

Prof. Sarah Coakley considers left side of the brain and the right side to produce different thinking states. The left ‘side of the brain (with) that neurological states associated with cool analysis and executive decisions’. 

Whereas ‘In contrast, the right brain’s capacity to replenish, enrich and re-invigorate our cultural imagination by means of meditation, dream, myth, ritual, music and poetry’. 

So My three questions will be:

  1. What left hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  2. What right hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?
  3. What might I preach about – living in suburban Kidderminster.

What left hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?

  1. There’s so much going on in this passage: how is Jesus able to enter through a locked door if his body is physical? Yet how was he able to breathe on them if his body isn’t physical? How could they see and touch his scars if his body wasn’t physical? Yet how might he enter the house a second time if his body was physical?
  2. Why did the giving of the Holy Spirit not increase the courage of the disciples; it seems nothing has changed?
  3. How are we blessed? Those of us who have not ‘seen’ and yet believe.

What right hand side of the brain thinking might I find surprising or challenging in this passage?

  1. Visual evidence prompts the disciples rejoicing. Apart from the words we say, what visual prompts can we give to help our congregations rejoice again this Sunday?
  2. I’ve been inspired by this dictionary definition of retain. To keep possession of rather than to let go. Let us never hold on to the sins of others. Forgiveness is a process but when we physically want to hold on to the sins of others the process can’t start.

retain |rɪˈteɪn|

verb [ with obj. ]

continue to have (something); keep possession of:

3.   How does it feel to be ‘sent’? Remember being sent at school with a message.    Remember being sent to sign on?                                 .

What might I preach about – living in suburban Kidderminster.

  1. I might preach on ‘being sent’. I think we have forgotten we are being sent. I’ve / We’ve got side tracked on the way.
  2. I might remind people that enjoying holding onto the sins of those stops the process of forgiveness starting. I’ve had quite a few funerals this year when sons/daughters didn’t come.
  3. I might ask that Jesus breathes on us as it seems without his breath this holding on will continue.
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